Almachar

Small and cosy town of 2.000 inhabitants is situated in the heart of La Axarquía and its landscape is dominated by even elevations with extensive vine crops. Its origin, like the majority of the towns in the area, dates back to the settlements set up during the Muslim era, which is clearly reflected by the typical Moorish layout of its streets which rising from the bed of the River Almáchar up to the top of the town, lead us to the “Paseo de la Axarquía”, from whose vantage point one can gaze out at excellent views of the district. The actual name of Almáchar, comes from the Arabic word, Al Maysar, meaning “the meadows” or “land of meadows”.

The first historical facts kept date back to the Sixteenth Century, when various families dedicated to grazing- animal farming, take over these lands abandoned by the Muslims. In 1755, the town suffers the consequences of various earthquakes which force the inhabitants to take shelter in the surrounding, desimated farms.

As a lover of its traditions, Almáchar celebrates with especial interest its local festivities and holidays. Apart from “el carnaval”, Holy Week, “la Romería de San Isidro” in May, The Corpus and the fair in honour of its Patron “Ntra. Sra. Del Amparo”, the function of “El Santo Cristo de la Banda Verde”, honorary patron by popular acclaim, which takes place on the first weekend of May; and, the first Saturday of September, the feast of “Ajoblanco” (declared of national tourist interest) attract attention.

The gastronomy plays a noteworthy role in the town’s touristic offers. Its excellent raisins of muscatel grapes, from its vineyards, has its proper denomination and produce excellent wines, apart from being used to make the famous cold garlic and almond soup with muscatel grapes (ajoblanco con uva de moscatel), typical dish par excellence of Almáchar. Just as recommended are “las sopas amarillas” and “las berzas de coles”.